Cultural Percussionist

Milt Jackson Day

MiltonBagsJackson (January 1, 1923 – October 9, 1999) was an American jazz vibraphonist, usually thought of as a bebop player, although he performed in several jazz idioms. He is especially remembered for his cool swinging solos as a member of the Modern Jazz Quartet and his penchant for collaborating with several hard bop and post-bop players.

A very expressive player, Jackson differentiated himself from other vibraphonists in his attention to variations on harmonics and rhythm. He was particularly fond of the twelve-bar blues at slow tempos. He preferred to set the vibraphone‘s oscillator to a low 3.3 revolutions per second (as opposed to Lionel Hampton‘s speed of 10 revolutions per second) for a more subtle tremolo. On occasion, Jackson sang and played piano professionally.

Jackson was born on January 1, 1923 in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Manley Jackson and Lillie Beaty Jackson. Like many, he was surrounded by music from an early age, particularly that of religious meetings: “Everyone wants to know where I got that funky style. Well, it came from church. The music I heard was open, relaxed, impromptu soul music” (quoted in Nat Hentoff’s liner notes to Plenty, Plenty Soul). He started on guitar when he was seven, then on piano at 11.

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